Prevent Mosquitoes at Your Apartment

prevent mosquitoesMosquito bites shouldn’t ruin the summer for you. Open the windows and curtains and enjoy the weather from the inside of your home. Keep the mosquitoes away from your apartment this summer with these tips.

Screens

Most modern windows come with screens. But some don’t. You can purchase a low-cost screen to fit any window size at most hardware stores. Lighten things up with some sunshine. Enjoy the breeze and air out your apartment with a window screen.

Seal Windows and Doors

As time goes by, wood splits and houses settle. Basically what this means is sometimes your windows and doors allow a bit of air (and therefore bugs) to get by. Insects crawl through the smallest cracks. You can prevent most bugs from entering your home by purchasing door sweeps and weather strips. Either will take about five minutes or less to apply. It’s worth the peace of mind. Then you’ll also be prepared for winter!

Outdoor Water and Plants

If you have a patio or balcony attached to your apartment, be sure no standing water is sitting in plants, bowls, or chairs. Mosquitoes are notorious for breeding in standing water. Females prefer to lay eggs here. So it’ll also attract males.

If you don’t have plants on your patio, get some. Certain types of plants actually repel mosquitoes. You’ll also add to your balcony’s beauty. What’s the downside? With plants, you’ll get fresh air and, with certain types, a mosquito-free patio or balcony.

Repelling mosquitoes is actually pretty simple. Ensure they don’t ruin your summer by taking simple steps. And if all else fails, use mosquito repellent spray. Enjoy yourself this summer by preventing mosquito bites.

Tips for Storing Books

Tips for Storing Books

If this is your first time storing books, you might think the process will be as easy as storing anything else: pack them up in boxes and throw them on a shelf. But that’s not exactly the case here. Books are delicate, sensitive to changes in their environments. Store your books with the confidence that they won’t diminish in value.

Preparation

Clean. You might not think dust is a big problem, but it can cause covers to fade, lose texture, and damage their surfaces after books set for too long. Inspect all your books for dust and dirt.

After you clean, you may want to wrap any books with dust jackets in Mylar book covers. This thin, plastic material is actually sturdy enough to prevent most damages to book covers. Plus, in the future, if you spill something in the vicinity of your book, it won’t necessarily ruin its cover.

Storage

The first thing you’ll want to consider is the kind of storage unit you want your books in. Climate-controlled storage is best, since you will be able to not only monitor the temperature of the unit but also the humidity levels. Aside from that, you probably shouldn’t store books in a unit without, at least, temperature-control, which makes the unit immune to major temperature changes (these units typically guarantee a range of temperatures for your storage: a range in Fahrenheit from about 50 degrees to 90 degrees).

Next, boxes, bags, or totes? If you use boxes, don’t use secondhand boxes, especially if they contained items that typically emit an odor (food, leather, etc.). These odors will settle in books after a period of exposure.

Don’t store in plastic bags. Not only can these produce gases after some time (which will settle in your books), but they also can trap humidity and water, forming a layer of condensation around your books. Bags can basically create the same environment as a humid basement.

Totes are usually okay for a few reasons. If the outside of the tote gets wet, the moisture won’t sink through the tote to the books (like it would a box). Secondly, there is usually extra space in the tote, which would allow for some air circulation for your books. And, thirdly, you won’t have to worry about the acid that some boxes contain yellowing the pages of your books.

Whatever you choose to do, now you have the information to store your books like a pro. Happy packing!

Tips for Storing Books

Tips for Storing BooksIf this is your first time storing books, you might think the process will be as easy as storing anything else: pack them up in boxes and throw them on a shelf. But that’s not exactly the case here. Books are delicate, sensitive to changes in their environments. Store your books with the confidence that they won’t diminish in value.

Preparation

Clean. You might not think dust is a big problem, but it can cause covers to fade, lose texture, and damage their surfaces after books set for too long. Inspect all your books for dust and dirt.

After you clean, you may want to wrap any books with dust jackets in Mylar book covers. This thin, plastic material is actually sturdy enough to prevent most damages to book covers. Plus, in the future, if you spill something in the vicinity of your book, it won’t necessarily ruin its cover.

Storage

The first thing you’ll want to consider is the kind of storage unit you want your books in. Climate-controlled storage is best, since you will be able to not only monitor the temperature of the unit but also the humidity levels. Aside from that, you probably shouldn’t store books in a unit without, at least, temperature-control, which makes the unit immune to major temperature changes (these units typically guarantee a range of temperatures for your storage: a range in Fahrenheit from about 50 degrees to 90 degrees).

Next, boxes, bags, or totes? If you use boxes, don’t use secondhand boxes, especially if they contained items that typically emit an odor (food, leather, etc.). These odors will settle in books after a period of exposure.

Don’t store in plastic bags. Not only can these produce gases after some time (which will settle in your books), but they also can trap humidity and water, forming a layer of condensation around your books. Bags can basically create the same environment as a humid basement.

Totes are usually okay for a few reasons. If the outside of the tote gets wet, the moisture won’t sink through the tote to the books (like it would a box). Secondly, there is usually extra space in the tote, which would allow for some air circulation for your books. And, thirdly, you won’t have to worry about the acid that some boxes contain yellowing the pages of your books.

Whatever you choose to do, now you have the information to store your books like a pro. Happy packing!

Mottos of the Organized

Mottos of the Organized

Don’t let your stuff own you

It’s easier said than done. Some people collect so much stuff throughout their lives, they have no idea what to do with it. So they keep it. Then have to pay for space to store it. And the problem just perpetuates itself. When you make financial decisions about where to live, because you have a bunch of stuff that you don’t use but need to bring with you, then your stuff owns you. Don’t let that happen.

When it’s not fun, you’re done

Two questions to ask yourself about the things you own: Are you using it and is it fun? If the objects sitting around your home are never used, why do you keep them? Consider this: clutter in your home contributes to, or may reflect, mental clutter. It may both cause and reflect anxiety. Clear up the things you don’t use, the things that no longer contribute to your life, and notice how it affects your day-to-day mentality.

Free space is worth more than occupied space

When all kinds of objects just occupy space and have no other use, you basically pay for the objects to sit there. It’s like renting out space. And every time you want something new, you’ll have to find a new place for it. This is the cycle that owning too many things all too often becomes.

To get out of this rut, consider the value of free space. Free space is possibility. You can do anything with it.

The past should remain in the past

If you want a change in your lifestyle, consider the objects you surround yourself with. Are they just things of the past, no longer contributing anything to your lifestyle or the lifestyle you want? Are they things that remind you of what you were but don’t want to be? Let everything that holds you back stay in the past. Try surrounding yourself with things that inspire you, things that hold you to a certain level of living.

Getting organized can be very difficult. Disorganization is a habit, and breaking habits is difficult. Remembering these mottos will make it easier to break the chains of habit.

Mottos of the Organized

Mottos of the OrganizedDon’t let your stuff own you

It’s easier said than done. Some people collect so much stuff throughout their lives, they have no idea what to do with it. So they keep it. Then have to pay for space to store it. And the problem just perpetuates itself. When you make financial decisions about where to live, because you have a bunch of stuff that you don’t use but need to bring with you, then your stuff owns you. Don’t let that happen.

When it’s not fun, you’re done

Two questions to ask yourself about the things you own: Are you using it and is it fun? If the objects sitting around your home are never used, why do you keep them? Consider this: clutter in your home contributes to, or may reflect, mental clutter. It may both cause and reflect anxiety. Clear up the things you don’t use, the things that no longer contribute to your life, and notice how it affects your day-to-day mentality.

Free space is worth more than occupied space

When all kinds of objects just occupy space and have no other use, you basically pay for the objects to sit there. It’s like renting out space. And every time you want something new, you’ll have to find a new place for it. This is the cycle that owning too many things all too often becomes.

To get out of this rut, consider the value of free space. Free space is possibility. You can do anything with it.

The past should remain in the past

If you want a change in your lifestyle, consider the objects you surround yourself with. Are they just things of the past, no longer contributing anything to your lifestyle or the lifestyle you want? Are they things that remind you of what you were but don’t want to be? Let everything that holds you back stay in the past. Try surrounding yourself with things that inspire you, things that hold you to a certain level of living.

Getting organized can be very difficult. Disorganization is a habit, and breaking habits is difficult. Remembering these mottos will make it easier to break the chains of habit.

Tips for Storing Rugs

Tips for Storing Rugs

Maybe you’ve downsized your living space for a while. Or maybe you have family staying for an extended visit, and you don’t want their dogs to trample your large, pristine rug. Whatever your situation, when you put your rug in storage, you’ll want to prepare it properly.

Clean

First thing’s first: clean the rug thoroughly. Dirt, when concentrated in a small area of a rug, can form a clump, causing a smooth, hard surface on the rug. This, obviously, is completely undesirable. So dust the rug, then vacuum, and repeat a few times. Diligence will not only rid the rug of dust and dirt, but it’ll also prevent entrenched hair and dust from causing odors over long periods of storage.

Prevent

Next, you’ll want to prevent water and pest damage from ruining your rug while it’s in storage.

To prevent pests, apply a repellent designed for rugs. Then let it set for a few minutes before you roll it up, especially if the repellent is a liquid. You don’t want the rug to be wet for the next step. A wet rug in storage is a recipe for mold.

Never fold the rug. This will compromise the foundation, causing breaks and folds that irreversibly separate its material. Rather, roll up the rug. If it’s delicate, have the material facing outside, as this will put less pressure on its foundation. Either way, be sure to wrap the rug in paper wrapping which will allow moisture to escape while also protecting the exposed, rolled-up exterior.

Storage

The ideal place for a rug is in a climate-controlled storage unit. That way, you’ll control how much moisture is in the air. Some rugs soak up humidity, causing them to trap odors. But, to be sure, check out the material type and what kind of conditions it can endure. Certainly, a temperature-controlled unit or a regular storage unit will be less expensive. If this is a route you can go, it will be more cost-effective.

At the end of the day, you’ll just want to have your rug off the floor, which prevents pest infestation and moisture accumulation. And you’ll want it out of direct light, which can cause certain materials to fade. You’ll also want to check it every once in a while. The sooner you discover issues, the sooner you can resolve them.

Conclusion

Rugs can be finicky. Be sure to research the kind of rug you have and what kind of conditions it can endure without losing value or beauty. And, as you follow these tips, you can be sure that your rug is perfectly prepared for storage.

Tips for Storing Rugs

Tips for Storing RugsMaybe you’ve downsized your living space for a while. Or maybe you have family staying for an extended visit, and you don’t want their dogs to trample your large, pristine rug. Whatever your situation, when you put your rug in storage, you’ll want to prepare it properly.

Clean

First thing’s first: clean the rug thoroughly. Dirt, when concentrated in a small area of a rug, can form a clump, causing a smooth, hard surface on the rug. This, obviously, is completely undesirable. So dust the rug, then vacuum, and repeat a few times. Diligence will not only rid the rug of dust and dirt, but it’ll also prevent entrenched hair and dust from causing odors over long periods of storage.

Prevent

Next, you’ll want to prevent water and pest damage from ruining your rug while it’s in storage.

To prevent pests, apply a repellent designed for rugs. Then let it set for a few minutes before you roll it up, especially if the repellent is a liquid. You don’t want the rug to be wet for the next step. A wet rug in storage is a recipe for mold.

Never fold the rug. This will compromise the foundation, causing breaks and folds that irreversibly separate its material. Rather, roll up the rug. If it’s delicate, have the material facing outside, as this will put less pressure on its foundation. Either way, be sure to wrap the rug in paper wrapping which will allow moisture to escape while also protecting the exposed, rolled-up exterior.

Storage

The ideal place for a rug is in a climate-controlled storage unit. That way, you’ll control how much moisture is in the air. Some rugs soak up humidity, causing them to trap odors. But, to be sure, check out the material type and what kind of conditions it can endure. Certainly, a temperature-controlled unit or a regular storage unit will be less expensive. If this is a route you can go, it will be more cost-effective.

At the end of the day, you’ll just want to have your rug off the floor, which prevents pest infestation and moisture accumulation. And you’ll want it out of direct light, which can cause certain materials to fade. You’ll also want to check it every once in a while. The sooner you discover issues, the sooner you can resolve them.

Conclusion

Rugs can be finicky. Be sure to research the kind of rug you have and what kind of conditions it can endure without losing value or beauty. And, as you follow these tips, you can be sure that your rug is perfectly prepared for storage.

How to Prepare Your Washer and Dryer for Storage

Tips for Preparing Your Washer and Dryer for Storage

Maybe you’re in between homes, or your new place doesn’t have a designated area for your washer and dryer yet. Whatever your situation, the following tips will prove useful as you prepare your washer and dryer for storage.

Cleaning

First thing’s first: clean your washer. You don’t want your washer to rust while it sits in storage. Nor do you want detergent residue to harden beyond the point of no return. Simply clean your washer by running a hot water cycle with vinegar. Then dry it with a towel.

All you’ll want to do for your dryer is clean out the lint tray well, by simply rubbing a damp cloth against its filter.

Disconnecting

Many manuals actually lay out the steps for disconnecting your washer and dryer. You’ll want to consult a manual if you have it. Otherwise, generally you’ll want to turn off the water, the electricity breakers, and disconnect the hoses. Then your machines will be ready to move.

Moving

You may be surprised by how light washers and dryers are. But, whether they’re light or heavy, you’ll want to purchase or borrow a dolly. Transportation will be much easier, and you won’t have to worry about denting or jarring anything. If you hire a moving company, don’t forget to stay informed about their policies.

Storing

Wrap both your machines with either shrink wrap or a blanket. This will keep them clean from dust and protect them from dents and scratches, if you’ll be moving things around a lot.

Another thing you’ll want to do is store them on pallets. This will keep them from forming condensation underneath, as pallets allow airflow. And, as a bonus, they’ll protect your units in the unlikely occasion that water gets into your unit.

How to Prepare Your Washer and Dryer for Storage

Tips for Preparing Your Washer and Dryer for StorageMaybe you’re in between homes, or your new place doesn’t have a designated area for your washer and dryer yet. Whatever your situation, the following tips will prove useful as you prepare your washer and dryer for storage.

Cleaning

First thing’s first: clean your washer. You don’t want your washer to rust while it sits in storage. Nor do you want detergent residue to harden beyond the point of no return. Simply clean your washer by running a hot water cycle with vinegar. Then dry it with a towel.

All you’ll want to do for your dryer is clean out the lint tray well, by simply rubbing a damp cloth against its filter.

Disconnecting

Many manuals actually lay out the steps for disconnecting your washer and dryer. You’ll want to consult a manual if you have it. Otherwise, generally you’ll want to turn off the water, the electricity breakers, and disconnect the hoses. Then your machines will be ready to move.

Moving

You may be surprised by how light washers and dryers are. But, whether they’re light or heavy, you’ll want to purchase or borrow a dolly. Transportation will be much easier, and you won’t have to worry about denting or jarring anything. If you hire a moving company, don’t forget to stay informed about their policies.

Storing

Wrap both your machines with either shrink wrap or a blanket. This will keep them clean from dust and protect them from dents and scratches, if you’ll be moving things around a lot.

Another thing you’ll want to do is store them on pallets. This will keep them from forming condensation underneath, as pallets allow airflow. And, as a bonus, they’ll protect your units in the unlikely occasion that water gets into your unit.

Tips for Moving Large Mirrors

Tips for Moving Large Mirrors

It’s the one thing you dread moving: the 100 pound, colossal mirror. If you’ve never moved a large mirror with a moving truck before, every little bump in the road will make you second guess the thickness of the sheet you wrapped it in. But, with just a few tips, you’ll be ready to go.

Tape

This step is especially important for larger mirrors. You’ll want to tape across the mirror, horizontally and vertically. Create all kinds of crisscrosses. If your mirror breaks during the move, the pieces won’t shatter all over the place. Instead, the tape will keep the shards in a somewhat better position to dispose of without injury.

Bubble Wrap

It’s just essential. Bubble wrap will protect the mirror from edges and corners, bumps and boxes. Bubble wrap the mirror as many times as you want. The more you have the better, right? Just don’t pop the bubbles until after the move.

The Best Box

Invest in a mirror carton. It’s a box specially made for mirrors. The mirror carton is divided into four parts that interlock and move to fit the frames of most mirrors. In conjunction with the bubble wrap and tape, you won’t have any problems moving any mirror.

And best of all, you won’t have to worry about breaking them. Who needs that kind of luck, anyway?